List of Commonly Used French Adjectives That Sound Truly Musical

List of Commonly Used French Adjectives
French is popular for being one of the softest and most romantic languages in the world, and some French terms and words have become an integral part of our everyday language, n'est pas? If knowing just a few French terms isn't enough for you, and you want to know more, read on for a list of commonly used French adjectives.
Don't Forget!
Every noun in the French language has a gender―it is either masculine or feminine. The adjectives always have to agree with the gender and number of the noun.
To put it simply, adjectives are defined as 'describing words' or words that describe a noun, or a noun phrase. The adjective gives more information about the noun, thus giving it more quality in that sentence. For instance, in English, we use adjectives such as pretty, vain, ancient, cold, etc., to describe nouns. Similarly, the French language uses adjectives too, for describing various nouns. However, the position of adjectives in French greatly differs from the position of adjectives in English.

In English, the adjective is positioned BEFORE the noun. For instance: The hot coffee, where hot is the adjective describing coffee, which is the noun. In French, the adjective is positioned AFTER the noun. For instance- Le café chaud, where chaud is the adjective, and le café is the noun. (Oh and by the way, I have used the same phrase as an example in both languages. So le café chaud is the hot coffee.)

This rule of the positioning of the adjective generally applies to most of the adjectives in French. However, just like most rules have their exceptions, this one does too.

Before we get into the list of adjectives, however, there are a few things I'd like you to know, and which you should keep in mind whenever you read/write/speak French.
  • As mentioned above, every single noun has a gender―it is either masculine or feminine. There is no 'it'. It's always a 'he' or a 'she', even in the case of inanimate objects.
  • Except for a few cases, the feminine words always end with an 'e'. However, I repeat, there are a few exceptions to this.
  • To make a masculine word plural, an 's' is added at the end. In case of a feminine word, 'es' is added to make it plural. Remember, there are exceptions to this rule too.
List of French Adjectives That are Positioned Before The Noun
AdjectiveMeaning
BelleBeautiful
BeauHandsome
Long(ue)Long
Joli(e)Pretty, Cute
Bon(ne)Good
Mauvais(e)Bad
Petit(e)Small, Tiny
Nouveau /Nouvel(le)New
Excellent(e)Excellent, Wonderful
Vieux / Vieil(le)Old
Gros(se)Fat
Grand(e)Big, Huge
JeuneYoung
MêmeSame
Meilleur(e)Better
Vilain(e)Wicked, Bad
French Adjectives To Describe a Person's Appearance
Adjective (m)Adjective (f)Meaning
BeauBelleBeautiful, Handsome
AttrayantAttrayanteAttractive
JoliJoliePretty, Cute
LaidLaideUgly
GrandGrandeBig, Tall
PetitPetiteSmall, Tiny
GrosGrosseFat, Overweight
MinceMinceThin, Slender
BlondBlondeBlond
ChauveChauveBald
En bonne santéEn bonne santéHealthy
FaibleFaibleWeak
FortForteStrong
French Adjectives To Describe Personality
Adjective (m)Adjective (f)Meaning
BonBonneGood
MauvaisMauvaiseBad
SympathiqueSympathiqueNice, Kind-hearted
SympasSympasNice
GentilGentilleGentle, Nice
OptimistOptimisteOptimistic, Positive
PessimistPessimistePessimistic, Negative
AffectueuxAffectueuseAffectionate
AmicalAmicaleAmicable, Friendly
AbordableAbordableApproachable
FrancFrancheCandid, Innocent
GénéreuxGénéreuseGenerous
UtileUtileHelpful
BavardBavardeTalkative
CompétantCompétanteCapable
DrôleDrôleFunny
IntellectualIntellectuelleAcademic
À la modeÀ la modeStylish, Fashionable
SensibleSensibleSensitive
CourageuxCourageuseBrave
VaniteuxVaniteuse Vain
ImpoliImpolieImpolite, Rude
MéchantMéchanteBad, Mean, Wicked
OdieuxOdieuseObnoxious
Other Commonly Used French Adjectives
Adjective (m)Adjective (f)Meaning
FroidFroideCold
ChaudChaudeHot
ClairClaireBright
HautHauteHigh
ProprePropreClean
SalSalleDirty
PleinPleinFull
LourdLourdeHeavy
LégerLégère Light (Not heavy)
VideVideEmpty
SecSècheDry
HumideHumideDamp
LoinLoinFar
ProcheProcheNear
RicheRicheRich
PauvrePauvrePoor
FacileFacileEasy
DifficileDifficileDifficult
HeureuxHeureuseHappy
TristeTristeSad
FatiguéFatiguéeTired
FouFolleMad
MouMolleSoft
French Demonstrative Adjectives
Demonstrative adjectives are normally used to replace articles in order to indicate a specific noun. Demonstrative adjectives in English are this, that, these, those. Demonstrative adjectives in French are supposed to agree with the gender and the number of the noun, unlike demonstrative adjectives in English, which are common for all nouns.

Ce: This/That Masculine Singular
Cet: This/That Masculine Singular, used if the succeeding word begins with a vowel
Cette: This/That Feminine Singular
Ces: These/Those ( for both masculine and feminine nouns)
Irregular French Adjectives
Most of the adjectives we commonly use in French are regular. However, there are a few irregular adjectives that have irregular masculine and feminine forms, and even an irregular plural form.

(m/s) form(m/s) form (vowel)(f/s) form(m/p) form(f/p) form
BeauBelBelleBeauxBelles
VieuxVieilVeilleVieuxVeilles
NouveauNouvelNouvelleNouveauxNouvelles
FouFolFolleFousFolles
MouMolMolleMousMolles
Remembering all these adjectives may seem a little overwhelming at first, but it'll soon get easier with practice. Remember, the adjective has to agree with the number and the gender of the noun, and that every noun is either masculine, or feminine! With these rules in mind, you'll definitely get the hang of these adjectives in no time! Bon chance!